Queer(er) squatting at Sutton House

Really excited for this event that I have co-organised with Milo Bettocchi on March 22nd at Sutton House.

In 1985, Sutton House was occupied by squatters and re-named ‘the Blue House’. Rock concerts were held in the barn, and an old copy of the 1979 edition of the Squatters’ Handbook featuring legendary squatter, British Black Panther and feminist activist Olive Morris on the cover was recently found in the attic. Much like Sutton House, squatting has a colourful history in London, and much like the word Queer, this history is varied and contested.

Squatting has been used as a tactic by many LGBTQ people not only to survive but also to experiment with creating spaces in which they could thrive. This discussion will feature three queer speakers with histories of squatting across London. Learn about London’s radical queer history, and how they disrupt conventional understandings of squatting!

There will also be a rare opportunity to explore Hackney’s oldest house at night, and visit our new exhibition about Clive Jenkins and the ASTMS trade union, the last residents of the house before it was squatted.

All proceeds from the evening help us to carry out the important community outreach and conservation work we do.

Speakers

Caoimhe Mader McGuinness lived and organised events in squats in France and the United Kingdom in the early 2000s. After attending Queeruption 4 in London in 2002, she was part of a queer squatting collective in St Etienne (to her knowledge the first in France) before moving to London in 2004 to live in a queer squatted house which remained queer and squatted until 2010. She was involved in organising a series of queer parties and fundraising events in squatted social centres in the city including Behind Bars, Queers Against X-Mas, G8 defendant support, and more recently Queer Caff at The Field (urban commons space), a monthly queer café that ran for a little less than a year in 2015. In her unfree time she is a lecturer in Drama at Kingston University London and publishes work on performance and politics.

Zia is an ex-squat baby, from a time and place when such things were more readily possible. The modern presentations of Brixton’s historic squatting scene fail to chime with Zia’s experience. Recent stories of squatting in Brixton from the 1970s up until the 1990s, with a few exceptions, are often faded, overwhelmingly white, British, and middle-class. Zia’s experience of this scene was far from this. The community they grew up in was utopically communitarian in ideal, but tough practically. Disidentification and experimentation, especially in regards to sexuality, were the norm, and the notion of the family as a fixed unit was being actively destabilised. It was a scene of illegal immigrants, redbrick Marxists, black and mixed-race anarcha-punks, working-class leather queers, DIY hippies, slumming Romantic hipsters – all with their own histories of struggle, their own ideas about the perfect future and about how to live together in the present

Milo Bettocchi, formerly of the House of Brag (a south London queer squatting collective active between 2012 and 2014) is now a PhD student at the University of Nottingham, where his research focuses on histories of anti-racist, feminist and LGBTQIA squatting in Brixton. He has co-led walking tours of Brixton’s queer squatting histories along with members of the London Rebel Dykes.

Tickets are selling quickly! Please book your tickets here: https://www.nationaltrust.org.uk/events/d82089d2-5d4e-4b02-bd57-354185c6adfb/pages/details

Speak Out! LGBTQ+ history exhibition & the 2016 LGBTQ ALMS conference

Hello! Apologies for such a lengthy gap between blog posts. I started working in a secondary school in Hackney in November, and I’m still writing up my thesis, which leaves little time for blogging, but I shall endeavour to do better!

Speak Out!

Speak Out London, LGBTQ+ history exhibition is now up and running at the London Metropolitan Archives. I am so pleased and proud to have been a part of such an excellent project. The exhibition is part of an LGBTQ+ oral history community project revealing stories of LGBTQ experience in London from 1395 to the present. It’s been a real labour of love for the LMA team, myself and a legion of volunteers. The next phase of the project is a website!

Here are a few pictures:

I’m particularly pleased with our wall of contested definitions, where visitors are invited (and encouraged) to graffiti it with their own additions, corrections and thoughts to the ever-evolving ways in which those in our wonderful community define, describe and identify.

LGBTQ+ ALMS conference 2016 ‘Without Borders’

Another project I’m involved with is the 2016 LGBTQ+ Archives, Libraries, Museums and Special Collections (ALMS) conference, hosted by Bishopsgate, University of Westminster and LMA.

I would never have thought, when me and Jan Pimblett (from the LMA) were drinking jagermeister in the oldest lesbian bar in Amsterdam during the 2012 ALMS conference that we would be working together on its follow up in London. The programme is phenomenal, and can be found here. And over the next few weeks in the build up, the website will be continuing to grow with tasters, teasers and tidbits! Keep up to date here. Hope to see many of you there! You can buy tickets here.

‘Without Borders’ LGBTQ Archives, Libraries, Museums and Special Collections conference

Hello all, just a reminder that the deadline for proposals for the LGBTQ Archives, Libraries, Museums and Special Collections conference 2016 is looming ever closer, they are due by Friday 8th January 2016, details below, including how to submit. I’m also delighted to share the official logo for the conference, designed by the fabulously talented Alex Creep, who you might remember designed the beautiful poster for my ‘126’ exhibition!

WITHOUT BORDERS…

Archives, Libraries, Museums and Special Collections (ALMS) 2016, an International LGBTQ+ Conference hosted by the City of London through London Metropolitan Archives in partnership with Bishopsgate Institute and University of Westminster. 

Dates: 22 – 24 June 2016 Location: London

Background 

ALMS is an international conference focussed on the work by public, private, academic, and grassroots organisations which are collecting, capture and preserving archives of LGBTQ+ experiences, to ensure our histories continue to be documented and shared. The conference began in Minnesota in 2006 when the Tretter Collection and Quatrefoil Library co-hosted the first LGBT ALMS Conference. The last conference took place in Amsterdam in 2012 and saw archivists, activists, librarians, museums professionals and academics from around the world coming together to share success stories and discuss challenges involved in recording LGBTQ+ lives.

CALL FOR PAPERS 2016 

To reflect our emerging global community, the 2016 conference is titled ‘Without Borders’. Papers are invited from across the heritage, cultural, academic and grassroots communities. Our aim is to generate a dialogue within the co-dependent fields of LGBTQ+ historical research and collecting, and share experiences, ideas and best practice through a programme of presentations and short talks that explore margins, borders, barriers and intersections, past and present. Topics may include, but are not limited to:

Barriers –in accessing LGBTQ+ content within existing collections, and in collecting material from LGBTQ+ communities
Intersections – collecting, cataloguing or researching subjects which share multiple / contrasting identities
Margins – researching elusive or liminal subjects; learning, research or projects taking place outside formal institutions
Connections – uniting individuals or communities across boundaries through heritage or research
Border police – navigating the formal standards of the heritage sector, including official terms and language or constructions of identity

We invite 200 word abstracts offering informal 10-minute presentations that share work-in-progress or provide an introduction to new projects or research that address these themes.

We also invite 300 word abstracts for 20-minute papers or presentations exploring the themes in more detail.

We particularly welcome contributions from BME / QPOC (Black Minority Ethnic / Queer People of Colour) and Transgender communities, as well as from those living outside the UK and USA.

The ALMS conference 2016 is being delivered on a not-for-profit basis by London Metropolitan Archives and Bishopsgate Institute in order to encourage dialogue and share knowledge in LGBTQ+ histories and cultures. The conference is not being funded as part of a wider project and the organisers are unable to cover speakers’ costs except in cases where keynote or invited speakers are prevented from attendance for financial reasons. A limited number of bursaries for attendees will be made available at the beginning of 2016. 

Abstract deadline: Friday 8 January 2016
Abstracts to: jan.pimblett@cityoflondon.gov.uk
Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/LGBTQALMS Twitter: @LGBTQALMS #alms2016

Speak up! Speak out!

I’m very pleased to share the programme for the 13th Annual LGBTQ History and Archives conference at the London Metropolitan Archives. This year we’ll be hearing about the Speak Out! oral history project (about which I may have some very exciting news soon) and the Pride of Place project. There will also be an excerpt from All the nice girls.

The conference is a steal at just £10, and promises to be even better than last year’s! Hope to see many of you there. You can book here.

LGBTQ Archives, Libraries, Museums and Special Collections 2016: Without Borders

Sorry for the long gap in blog posts, I’ve been very busy working on my thesis, and much more exciting things, including this!

You might remember a much earlier post on this blog from just before I started my PhD, when I mentioned the LGBTI ALMS (Archives, Libraries, Museums and Special Collections) conference in Amsterdam. It was an incredible conference, and I’m so pleased to be a small part of its follow up in summer 2016. I am part of the steering committee, and the conference is hosted by London Metropolitan Archives and the Bishopsgate Institute, and a third institution which is to be announced shortly!

The call for papers is as follows:

Deadline for proposals is 8 January 2016:

WITHOUT BORDERS…
Archives, Libraries, Museums and Special Collections (ALMS) 2016
an International LGBTQ+ Conference hosted by the City of London through London Metropolitan Archives in partnership with Bishopsgate Institute.

Dates: 22 – 24 June 2016
Location: London

Background

ALMS is an international conference focussed on the work by public, private, academic, and grassroots organisations which are collecting, capture and preserving archives of LGBTQ+ experiences, to ensure our histories continue to be documented and shared. The conference began in Minnesota in 2006 when the Tretter Collection and Quatrefoil Library co-hosted the first LGBT ALMS Conference. The last conference took place in Amsterdam in 2012 and saw archivists, activists, librarians, museums professionals and academics from around the world coming together to share success stories and discuss challenges involved in recording LGBTQ+ lives.

CALL FOR PAPERS 2016

To reflect our emerging global community, the 2016 conference is titled ‘Without Borders’. Papers are invited from across the heritage, cultural, academic and grassroots communities. Our aim is to generate a dialogue within the co-dependent fields of LGBTQ+ historical research and collecting, and share experiences, ideas and best practice through a programme of presentations and short talks that explore margins, borders, barriers and intersections, past and present. Topics may include, but are not limited to:

• Barriers –in accessing LGBTQ+ content within existing collections, and in collecting material from LGBTQ+ communities
• Intersections – collecting, cataloguing or researching subjects which share multiple / contrasting identities
• Margins – researching elusive or liminal subjects; learning, research or projects taking place outside formal institutions
• Connections – uniting individuals or communities across boundaries through heritage or research
• Border police – navigating the formal standards of the heritage sector, including official terms and language or constructions of identity

We invite 200 word abstracts offering informal 10-minute presentations that share work-in-progress or provide an introduction to new projects or research that address these themes.

We also invite 300 word abstracts for 20-minute papers or presentations exploring the themes in more detail.

We particularly welcome contributions from BME / QPOC (Black Minority Ethnic / Queer People of Colour) and Transgender communities, as well as from those living outside the UK and USA.

The ALMS conference 2016 is being delivered on a not-for-profit basis by London Metropolitan Archives and Bishopsgate Institute in order to encourage dialogue and share knowledge in LGBTQ+ histories and cultures. The conference is not being funded as part of a wider project and the organisers are unable to cover speakers’ costs except in cases where keynote or invited speakers are prevented from attendance for financial reasons. A limited number of bursaries for attendees will be made available at the beginning of 2016.

Abstract deadline: Friday 8 January 2016
Abstracts to: jan.pimblett@cityoflondon.gov.uk

A website will shortly be launched, but in the mean time you can keep an eye out for announcements at the Facebook page and on twitter @LGBTQALMS

New York

Hello all, sorry for the radio silence, been a bit busy. I thought I’d share some brief thoughts about my visit to New York, which was amazing (but feels like a million years ago now…)

A few bits of news before I do:

  • I did an interview for the Queer East London Project, which you can read here.
  • ‘Twilight People: stories of faith and gender beyond the binary’ is looking for trans and gender variant people of faith to share their stories, see here for more details of how to get involved, it’s a groundbreaking project that I feel really privileged to be a part of.
  • An updated version of my book chapter about LGBTQ oral histories (including PICTURES!) appears in the new MuseumsEtc book ‘On Sexuality‘, it’s a really great book that collects together essays about making LGBTQ narratives visible in museums, it’s also more reasonably priced than the last one!
  • I’m part of a really great steering committee for the next LGBTQ+ Archives, Libraries, Museums and Special Collections conference. The last took place in 2012 in Amsterdam, and was incredible, I wrote about it at the time here. The committee includes archive professionals, artists, academics and activists from Bishopsgate Institute, London Metropolitan Archives, Kingston University, the Institute of Education (that’s me), Tower Hamlets Local History Library, rukus! Federation, the Parliamentary Archives, Tate Britain and University College London. I’ll keep you posted once the official blog is up and running, but in the meantime, like the Facebook page here.
  • I’ve been recruited as an ‘expert advisor’ for a new project by Leeds Beckett University and Historic England, which is crowdsourcing pins on a map highlighting LGBTQ history. The trial version is available here. Feel free to add your own pins, although for the trail the map includes only London.

That’s enough of that. On to New York.

Museum Association of New York: Museums in Action Conference “Museums Mean Business”
April 12th , Corning Museum of Glass

Myself and Lauren Windham presented a workshop together on the first day of this conference. Initially, it was to be a three person panel, but Ellie Lewis-Nunes was unfortunately unable to make it (I’m hiking with her to raise money for Macmillan Cancer Support, you can donate here!), so while it was bitter sweet, the talk was still a great success. Our workshop was called ‘Addressing the balance’ and we spoke about challenges arising when addressing specific community groups in historic buildings in London, and how this can extend to the regular visitor. I spoke about my work with Sutton House, and Lauren spoke about her time at Bruce Castle, and a project she ran with children and their non-English speaking parents. We had some really great questions, and people seemed really engaged with the subject.

We had a quick chance to poke around the new wing of the museum, and we were blown away. I must admit my expectations of glass museums are based on the one in my hometown of Sunderland, which may be great now, but when I visited it a very long time ago, it was a little dry. This new wing was spectacular, a huge array of really challenging contemporary glasswork in a beautiful naturally lit space, it really was breathtaking.

Bjork at MOMA

I am a huge Bjork fan, like worryingly huge. I have her words tattooed on my flesh (as well as the swan from Vespertine) and I’ve seen her live 6 times now (7 in July!), she truly is my idol and this exhibition felt like a pilgrimage for me. Four of her instruments, which I’d previously seen live on her Biophilia tour, were dotted around the museum atrium and removed from their natural context, it became even more clear what beautiful works of art they are, especially the pendulum harp.

The first part of the exhibition was an immersive screening of the MOMA commissioned video for Black Lake, which is the centrepiece of her new album Vulnicura. At ten minutes long, Black Lake is sparse and heartbreaking, probably Bjork’s most personal and vulnerable song to date. The video is understated, it features her walking around barefoot in the inside of a volcano, and only in the final minute or so does she surface to the moonlike mossy Iceland surface. The video is projected on two walls that are often in sync, but often show different things, and the small space they were played in was made to recreate the inside of a volcano, with crater-like protrusions lining the wall. The room had nearly 50 speakers, and we saw the film twice (I cried both times haha), the first time, everyone was sitting on the floor, which I thought was weird, and the second time, people stood and moved around the space. There’s a particular moment in the film during a long 30 second drawn out note from the strings, where Bjork, on her knees, pounds violently at her chest as if she is trying to restart her heart. I glanced around and it was really moving to see so many glistening eyes reflected from the glow of the screen. For me, if you can’t see an artist live, surely this is the ideal way to experience music, it was a staggering achievement.

The next part was the Bjork cinema, a room filled with red velvet cushions to lay on where they play all of Bjork’s music videos in chronological order. We spent about 40 minutes in there, I have seen all of those videos countless times, but it was a whole new experience to see them in this setting.

The final part was the timed-ticket section called ‘Songlines’, in which a fictional story about a woman moving through the albums of Bjork is whispered in your ears alongside snippets of her songs. It was a really creative and unusual way of telling the story of Bjork’s music, and of the strongly defined characters she creates for each of her albums. In each room, which corresponded to an album, were costumes and props from videos and live performances and Bjork’s notebooks.

The exhibition completely lived up to my expectations, and the Black Lake screening in particular completely surpassed it. I’m not sure I’ll ever love an exhibition as much as I loved this one, it truly felt like a religious experience.


(here’s me gazing lovingly at the bell dress from the Who Is It? video)

9/11 Memorial Museum

Lauren left to go back to Washington, it was really great to catch up with her after so long (she and I studied on our MA together), she is one of my heritage idols and a continued source of inspiration to me. I had a day on my own before my housemate arrived to stay for a week, so I went to see the 9/11 Memorial Museum. I was expecting it to be problematic to be honest, I imagined it would be extremely patriotic and Islamophobic, but I was very pleasantly surprised at how tasteful and moving it was, it was purely a commemoration of those lost in the attacks, and the interpretation combined stark monuments, rich and compassionate storytelling, and some really visually powerful moments (especially the missing posters that were projected onto one of the walls and gradually faded in and out). The fountains themselves were really beautiful too.

Two really interesting points (from a museum studies student perspective…); firstly, there was a recording studio for visitors to record their memories and thoughts about the day, these were then projected onto a long screen and was really beautifully done. Secondly, I’ve never experienced such a raw and solemn audience before, I’m a terrible eavesdropper in museums, as I think it’s a good lazy research tool, but in this museum the conversations were much more personal than usual, everyone remembers where they were that day, and everyone was very visibly moved and at times uncomfortable. The museum even had tissue dispensers at parts of the main exhibition, it was quite unlike anything I’d seen before.

Leslie Lohman Museum of Gay and Lesbian Art

One of the smaller treats we had was the Leslie Lohman, which is a really nice space devoted to LGBTQ art and artists. The mission statement reads: ‘The Leslie Lohman Museum of Gay and Lesbian Art is the first dedicated LGBTQ art museum in the world with a mission to exhibit and preserve LGBTQ art, and foster the artists who create it The Leslie-Lohman Museum embraces the rich creative history of the LGBTQ art community by educating, informing, inspiring, entertaining, and challenging all who enter its doors. The Museum is operated by the Leslie Lohman Gay Art Foundation, Inc., a non-profit founded in 1987 by Charles W. Leslie and Fritz Lohman who have supported LGBTQ artists for over 30 years.’

 

The exhibition we saw was called ‘Irreverent: a celebration of censorship’. The museum hosts up to 8 exhibitions a year, which is pretty remarkable for a non-profit venture, it was also one of the very few free museums we visited, which seems like a rare treat in New York, where entry to most museums is in excess of $15. I really wish there was an equivalent to this in London.

Brooklyn Museum

I think my favourite museum overall was the Brooklyn Museum. Lauren had recommended I go and see the Kehinde Wiley exhibition there, and the museum was already on my housemate’s to do list. It is one of the best art exhibitions I have seen in ages. Wiley paints huge portraits of people of colour in classic heroic poses, with rich and florid patterned backgrounds. They really are incredible, and the exhibition also featured work on stained glass and sculpture. We also saw the Jean-Michel Basquiat ‘Unknown Notebooks exhibition’ and looked around the permanent collections. It was great to see a museum genuinely privileging its local artists, and especially exciting to see people of colour represented on such a scale in such a huge museum.

These are just a few of the things we saw, we also saw a small exhibition of Keith Haring’s work, the American Folk Art Museum, the Museum of Morbid Curiosity (which was a HUGE disappointment), the Museum of Sex, the Brooklyn Botanic Gardens (which a lovely couple kindly gave us their tickets for so we didn’t have to pay!), a super cute little museum at Coney Island, and Lauren and I had a little tour of the Metropolitan Museum of Art.

If you get the chance to go to New York, definitely do! It was incredible and I hope I get the opportunity to go back one day, I feel like we only scratched the surface!

Here’s a little bonus picture of me admiring some of the art at the American Folk Art Museum:

Home and art: creating, performing and researching home

Just a quickie to say I’ll be speaking at this event on Friday 1st May. I realised I’m posting this too late to entice anyone to it, as the registration period has closed, (I’ve just got back from a conference in New York which I’ll blog about shortly) but I thought I’d share anyway, as it promises to be a really interesting day.

HOME AND ART: CREATING, PERFORMING AND RESEARCHING HOME
Friday 1st May 2015
The Geffrye Museum of the Home, London

Programme

10.00-10.15
Registration and Introduction
Richard Baxter and Olivia Sheringham
Queen Mary University of London 

10.15-11.00
Keynote 
Gill Perry
The Open University 
Breaking and Entering the Home: Practices, Problems and Definitions in Contemporary Art

11.00-12.20
Inside Home

Vanessa Marr
Artist and University of Brighton/Sussex Coast College 
Women and domesticity: investigating common experiences and perspectives through creative collaboration. A collection of hand-embroidered dusters

Sarah McAdam
Photographer and London College of Communication 
Home is Where the Art is

Cate Hursthouse
Artist and University of Hertfordshire 
Unmaking the homely: de-familiarising the tablecloth

Laura Cuch
Artist and University College London 
‘The Best Place in the World’: a biography of home

12.20-13.00
Lunch

13.00-13.40
Keynote
Sutapa Biswas
Artist 
Home and Hearth / Hearth and home. Love in a cold climate

13.40-15.00
Domestic Marginality

Sean Curran
Curator and UCL Institute of Education
Queer activism begins at home: the curator as activist in historic houses

Janetka Platun
Artist 
But where is home?

Alice Correia
University of Salford 
The House that Jack Built: Home, Identity and Legacies of Empire in the work of Donald Rodney

David Pinder
Queen Mary University of London 
‘If my house was still there’: sound, memory and the destruction of home

15.00-15.20
Tea and coffee

15.20-16.40
Performing Home

Jon Orlek, Mark Parsons and Cristina Cerrulli
University of Sheffield and Studio Polpo 
Open Public Experimental Residential Activity (OPERA): Looking Back and Looking Forwards

Paul Merchant
University of Cambridge 
Who can publicise the private? Domesticity, representation and class in ‘El hombre de al lado’

Nadege Meriau
Artist-in-residence Queen Mary University of London 
Home futures: exploring the Aylesbury Estate through video and sculpture

Katie Beswick
Queen Mary University of London
The Resident Artist: Jordan McKenzie’s Council Estate Practice

16.40-17.00
Closing Remarks
Harriet Hawkins
Royal Holloway University of London 
Collaboration and curation

Museum Association of New York: Museums in Action Conference “Museums Mean Business”

I’m really excited to be part of a panel at the Museum Association of New York’s annual Museums in Action Conference at the Corning Museum of Glass on the 12th of April.

Our panel takes place on Sunday 12th at 14.30, here are the details:

Title: 
Addressing the balance: negotiating potential conflicts between the regular visitor and specific community groups in historic buildings- UK and US perspectives

Facilitators: 
Lauren Windham (museum educator and historic guide at the United States Capitol in Washington, D.C), Ellie Lewis-Nunes (heritage educator at Ealing Council in West London, covering parks and open spaces and two historic houses; Gunnersbury Park Museum, Pitzhanger Manor), Sean Curran (PhD student at UCL IOE and curator/volunteer with the National Trust)

Panel description: 
This session aims to address potential challenges in negotiating the balance between creating innovative and thoughtful programming tailored to specific diverse audience groups, and programming with regular local visitors. The session will aim to provoke discussion about best practice and experience sharing through three innovative and adaptable case studies from historic buildings in London, England. Ellie Lewis-Nunes will discuss engaging 14-21 year olds in exhibitions and programming at Gunnersbury Park Museum, Sean Curran will discuss the challenges of unearthing lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender narratives at Sutton House, and Lauren Windham will discuss meeting the needs of international visitors and their differing roles as both tourists and immigrant populations in a community and their impact on programming. Lauren will transition from UK to US museums in her current work back in The States, which will then lead into a facilitator led discussion where participants will be invited to share experiences of working with diverse audience groups.

This is a great opportunity to share my research with an international audience, and to sample some of the museums New York has to offer, and I’m really looking forward to being reunited with, and working with Lauren and Ellie, who I met on the Museums and Galleries in Education MA at the IOE. I think it’s going to be a really great workshop and I’m looking forward to meeting those who attend.

You can see the full programme here.

‘Queer homes, queer houses’ workshop at ‘Lines of Dissent’, the 12th annual LMA LGBTQ History & Archives conference

Yesterday was London Metropolitan Archives’ 12th annual LGBTQ History and Archives conference. The day was co-curated by the Raphael Samuel History Centre and the theme was ‘Lines of Dissent’ and was focusing on queer genealogy. The key note from Daniel Monk, Birkbeck was ‘The perils and pleasures of queer wills’ and after that was a series of carousel workshops in which delegates got to play archive detective by looking at primary source documents and trying to gather what the material might say about the person, or people to whom they belonged.

In the afternoon, I facilitated a workshop called ‘Queer homes, queer houses’, in which I briefly spoke about my own research, and highlighted some examples of queer homes. I then asked the participants to create plans of a place they live, or have lived in, but instead of highlighting rooms or objects, to highlight moments and memories. We all did this on A3 tracing paper, and then we tied them all together to create a patchwork curtain (dubbed on the day, rather tongue-in-cheek, as a patchwork quilt of painful memories), which I then presented to all of the delegates. I’m delighted with how much effort everyone put in, and for sharing their memories, and I’m really grateful to Jan Pimblett, who organised the day, for inviting me to do a workshop. It has given me loads to think about for my research. You can view the work that was created here:


Created with flickr slideshow.

and I made a video of some highlights here:


‘Queer homes, queer houses’ : a workshop at the LMA LGBTQ History and Archives conference from Sean Curran on Vimeo.

Here are a few pictures of the workshop in progress:

and a few of me presenting it, thanks to my glamorous assistants Jan and Gavin:

Another highlight of the day for me was when Surat Shaan Knan of Rainbow Jews told us his personal story and wonderful news, and announced the successful funding bid for Twilight People, a project about trans* people of faith, which I am delighted to announce I will be co-curating. I can’t wait for us to work together, and I am sure this really important project will be a huge success!

Thanks again to Jan, to Gavin Baldwin, Matt Cook, Justin Bengry, Faridha Karim, Surat, and to everyone else who organised and contributed to make it such an inspiring day. Also, big thanks to Claire Hayward who ensured there was a lively twitter presence throughout the day, and who has storified the tweets here.

Lines of Dissent – 12th Annual LGBTQ History & Archives Conference

I’m really pleased to share the flyer for the London Metropolitan Archives’ 12 Annual LGBTQ History and Archives conference, run in partnership with the Raphael Samuel History Centre this year. I’ve been part of the conference steering committee for the last two years along with a great team, and this year I’ve been asked to host a practical workshop about queer homes. The focus this year is on LGBTQ genealogy and family history.

The conference takes place at the London Metropolitan Archives on December 6th, tickets are just £10, or £7.50 for concessions. You can book tickets here.

I hope to see many of you there!